Categories
Academic IELTS B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Language School Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation General IELTS Grammar IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation ISIC Language School Life in Reading Listening online english Reading Reading University skills Solent University Southampton Southampton University Universities in UK Vocabulary

The Benefits of Extensive Reading

Extensive reading – what is it?

Well, it’s like intensive reading: intensive reading for English classes or finding answers for your YES / NO /NOT GIVEN questions in IELTS, but for fun! Extensive reading is reading something that you enjoy or are interested in and lots of it; extensive reading is just reading, and it should be for enjoyment, interest or pleasure.

Reading is a mental activity as opposed to TV which is not; TV is purely visual (although TV is good for listening comprehension and pronunciation among other things, but that’s another story).

Everyone including those of us learning a second language can benefit from extensive reading. Carrel and Grabe (2010) argue that language learners can improve their comprehension and vocabulary by doing a little extensive reading. According to Julian Bamford and Richard Day (in Kreuzova 2019) you should read as much as you can on a variety of topics that you have chosen; the materials should be easily understandable to you from books, newspapers and magazines.

Extensive reading is moving away from the intensive reading of answer identification in your Cambridge, TOEFL or IELTS exams, and the reading skills of skimming and scanning toward a more relaxed form of reading; the kind of reading you do on the sofa because you want to, because there is nothing on TV or there’s nothing on your streaming service worth watching. So, think about what you like to read; are you interested in reading about what English-language newspapers say about your country or region; are you interested in learning about your own country’s history from another perspective? Like cooking? Read a few recipes? Remind yourself, what do you like reading in your own language: try reading the same in English.

I was surprised when I started to learn about British history from the Spanish and Argentinians. I never knew the British invaded Buenos Aries in the nineteenth century. I never knew the Dutch sailed up the Themes and stole the English flagship. It has also been suggested that extensive reading helps in examination results, make them more aware of the grammar when they are reading, increase a learner’s reading proficiency and by extension their vocabulary learning (Prowse, 2000) and (Liu and Zhang 2018).

There are other beneficial effects. It is generally believed that reading develops your concentration. When you’re watching TV, you’re probably doing something else: chatting, eating, doing your nails, interacting with social media, but reading, well reading is a different matter.

Now don’t get me wrong, I love binge-watching The Man in the High Castle on a lazy Saturday afternoon trying to forget work. With a book, you need to concentrate and focus on what is written and everything that it implies. Which brings me to another thing reading improves: your imagination. You can lose yourself in a character or situation, imagining yourself in their situation. Imagine yourself as a different person or asking yourself what you would do in such a situation.

In turn, reading is a good de-stressor; you are more likely to read when you’re in a quiet room, with no TV and oblivious to the world outside and exercising the most important organ in your body – your brain. So, while you are doing whatever you are doing like channel hoping, you are not using your imagination. We switch off our imaginations, but with a book we use our imaginations to a greater extent. Reading enhances your verbal skills; TV is visually-based media and normally uses short and simple sentences whereas books contain complex language more than you would find on TV or in a streaming service. This means using a greater range of vocabulary, longer sentences and more complex sentences; you can become aware of punctuation. So, go and borrow a graded reader from your school’s resource centre, borrow a book from the city library or read some on-line articles in magazines or newspapers on-line.

by Chris Scott, March 2020

Reference List

Carrel, Patricia. L., and Grabe, W. (2010). Reading. In: N. Schmitt, ed., Applied Linguistics, 2nd London: Hodder Education, Page 215- 229.

Sarka Kreuzova 17 July 2019, Encouraging Extensive Reading, English Teaching Professional (1 09), viewed 31 December 2019, < https://www.etprofessional.com/encouraging-extensive-reading >.

Philip Prowse (2000), The secret of reading, English Teaching Professional, (13), viewed 2 January,2020, < https://www.etprofessional.com/the-secret-of-reading >

Liu. J., and Zhang. J., (2018). ‘The Effects of Extensive Reading on English Vocabulary Learning: A Meta-analysis ‘, English Language Teaching; Vol. 11, No. 6; 2018, viewed 2 January 2020, < https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1179114.pdf >

Categories
CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Exams English Language School eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English General IELTS Grammar IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English online english Reading University Southampton Study Abroad Summer School Uncategorized Vocabulary writing

EASILY CONFUSED WORDS

English has a lot of words that can be easily confused not only by those of you learning English, but also by those of us studying English, and by ‘native’ speakers. English is a rich mix of different influences; very little survives of the original Celtic language from the original inhabitants of the British Isles apart from place names such as York; Church Latin brought by the Roman’s persisted until the sixteenth century; the Germanic Anglo-Saxon ‘settlers’ colonised the eastern and southern part of Britain by the 5th century. Then came the Viking invasions in the 9th and 10th centuries; they brought the influence of Old Norse. In 1066, the Norman conquest of England began bringing a heavy Norman French influence. Then with Britain’s expanding trade and eventually Empire new words entered the language brought not only by the British but the Portuguese, Spanish and Dutch empires thought trade.

There are also many inconsistencies in spellings; there are homographs (wind and wind), homophones (capital and capitol) and homonyms (produce the verb and produce the noun).

Confusion can come about when the meaning is misunderstood by the listener. When we learn a new language, or study our own language, enter a new job or read a new book we are confronted by new words that can confuse us in the form of faddy neologisms or jargon.

It took me a few days to stop using the Spanish word coger in South America; I could no longer coger el colectivo I had to tomar el colectivo (take the bus) in South America. In English there are a number of ways we can confuse ourselves; the first are the superficial differences between the ‘Englishes’ usually to do with spelling or semantics – the meaning of a word. For example, there were two computer programmers; one from America and one from England. When the English programmer and finished writing his program, he sat down to watch a TV programme; then, when the American finished her program she sat down to what her TV program. Which program or program you use depends on where you are and what you are doing. In the next two examples the meaning of each sentence is different; In England it is quite acceptable to say “I’ve never seen such a gorgeous ass”; you would be complimenting someone on their donkey, but using the exact same words in the United States could land you in gaol or is it jail? I get easily confused by these two words. There are also confusions brought about by time, for example, until the early twentieth century, it wasn’t unusual for people of a certain education to say, “I’m feeling rather gay today.” This meant “I’m feeling rather happy.” During this time people sometimes said they felt rather ‘queer’ or strange; both gay and queer have different meanings today – in the early twenty-first century; these are prime examples of the semantic shift in words. England also has a fantastic culinary tradition; one such culinary delight is the faggot; I love faggots and regularly eat them – faggots in England are large meatballs by the way. However, I am sure this is still an arrestable offence in some parts of the United States and the wider world.

Time has also changed the meaning of wicked and cool; in the late 1990s they meant something like fantastic or really good. In today’s news media the words snowflake and gammon have taken on a new meaning. These words are often used as terms of abuse in the news media it is debatable how much they are used outside the confines of newspapers and troll or water armies. Confusion can also occur through pronunciation; in the American ABC comedy TV series Modern Family the character Gloria Delgado-Pritchett played by the American-Columbian actor Sofía Vergara is asked by her husband to get some baby cheeses and she orders lots of baby Jesuses. But there is also confusion brought about by homophones; for example, which of the following means to be still or not moving? In her Grammarly blog Top 30 Commonly Confused Words in English, Brittney Ross mentions two confusing words: Complement and Compliment; both words are spelt differently; they both have different meanings but the same pronunciation both for the verb and noun forms. So, what happens when we hear these words, how do we learn how to spell them? Stationary or stationery? Confused? It’s common to confuse these two words even among so-called ‘native’ speakers, so look at the two words in context: The train was stationary, so I popped into the stationery store and got these envelopes and pens. How do I get around the problem? In my head I tend to stress the final vowel in both words and remember the context; that helps me remember the spelling. And there are the principles and principals: There are fundamental principles we all live by; one of them is that we shall not steal. Many school principals have at least a master’s degree is the headmaster of a school. How do you remember which is which? Well you could use spelling mnemonics; for example, my pal is a school principal. The other way of confusing you is the non-transparent spelling system; we don’t always mean or say what is written; in English vowels aren’t pronounced or used. Take, for example, the word chocolate; in Spanish all the vowels are pronounced, in English we are lazier and drop the second ‘o’ vowel sound, so it’s pronounced as choclate.

So, knowing how a word is pronounced and practicing can often help our spelling, but there is also the problem of the spell check; how many of us have used the spell check and this marvellous device has sent the wrong word making us look completely illiterate? Embarrassing isn’t it! As Brittney Ross says in her Grammarly blog Top 30 Commonly Confused Words in English ‘your word might be spelled right, but it may be the wrong word.’ We also have the double entendre is a figure of speech that has two meanings or interpretations; this form of ambiguity can cause confusion in meaning, for instance, newspaper headlines are notorious for this; take for example this headline, ‘Strikes to Paralyse Travellers’; does it mean that travellers will be physically paralysed or does it mean that the infrastructure will be paralysed and travellers won’t be able to travel? Anther confusing example is that 21 taxes choke tourism operators – Parliament cries; a parliament crying because tourism operators were choked by twenty-one taxes!

Chris Scott February 2020

Reference List

Brittney Ross [n.d.], Top 30 Commonly Confused Words in English, Grammarly blog, viewed 30 December 2019, < https://www.grammarly.com/blog/commonly-confused-words/ >.

Mirror.co.uk 17 August 2016, Strikes to Paralyse Travellers, Mirror, viewed 30 December 2019, < https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/strikes-to-paralyse-travellers-638297 >

Richard Annerquaye Abbey January 24, 2019, 21 taxes choke tourism operators – Parliament cries, viewed 30 December 2019, https://thebftonline.com/2019/editors-pick/21-taxes-choke-tourism-operators-parliament-cries/

Categories
English Exams English Language School English Testing Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton General IELTS IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English online english Solent University Southampton University Study Abroad Summer School travel Uncategorized websites writing

Critical Thinking

Ever since I went to college many years ago, I’ve been hearing the term critical thinking; it keeps popping up from time to time, but do we as teachers and students sit down and think about what this means, and do we use critical thinking outside the confines of academic study? Do we use this in our everyday lives?

For me, critical thinking is challenging the assumptions we have about the way we think, what we believe, what we read in the newspaper, what we are told, see on TV or the internet and hear in the world around us and not just in the classrooms; it’s about challenging dogma; it’s about looking at the preconceptions we and others have of the world around us; it is about challenging what we believe and how we behave.

Levels of Critical Thinking

For Chia Suan Chong (2019) it is about promoting meaningful and positive relationships and building empathy as well as developing one’s academic potential. But how can we use this in the classroom and in our everyday lives? What benefit does it give our students or us as learners?

Blooms Taxonomy (Bloom cited in Pineda-Báez) is most often cited when attempting to define critical thinking. According to Benjamin Bloom, there are six levels of critical thinking.

The first level is Remember; it is the ability to recall dates, people’s names, places, quotations and formula.

Level two is Understand; this is to comprehend what you are reading; it is to understand newly acquired information, to describe, classify and explain it, e.g. what is the difference between a cat and a lion.

The next level, level three, is called Apply; this is where we use this new information, solve problems, demonstrate, and interpret information.

Level four is Analyse; it looks at materials and decides what the overall purpose is; what is its relationship with other parts in society and the world in general. It is to differentiate, organize, and to relate information to the wider world, and compare or contrast.

The fifth level is Evaluate; this is to form an opinion or judgement based on standards and criteria; it seeks to appraise, argue and defend a point of view or opinion; it judges, selects, support, and critiques information.

The final level is Create; it is to use conjecture, formulate new ideas, and to investigate; it is to put all the information you have and create something innovative.

Critical Thinking Based on Reason

Another simpler definition of critical thinking is which I like is from Tim Moore (cited in Schmidt); According to research conducted by Moore, critical thinking is based on reason; in today’s world basing an argument on reason as opposed to reactionary opinions that are so prevalent in the news media and politics today is a good thing; it allows us to decide if something is good or bad, true or false, it allows us to consider the validity of something; it is thinking sceptically; critical thinking involves thinking productively, challenging ideas and producing new ideas; it involves coming to a conclusion about an issue or issues; importantly for me and something I feel strongly about; it is about looking beyond a reading or listening text’s literal meaning.

Critical Thinking in the EFL classroom

When we look at these levels, we see that we as students use most of them in the EFL classroom; those of you preparing for the IELTS and Cambridge English exam use them all the time; it is a valuable skill that students use when they enter institutes of higher education.

Regardless of your background we use critical thinking skills when deciding what to what, buy in the supermarket or believe in the newspaper.

How can they be used more in the EFL classroom or our own language learning? In her article Ten ways to consider different perspectives, Chong suggests a number of activities where critical thinking can be applied to classroom activities; one activity is ‘What would their day look like? Where the students select a photo of a person, animal or inanimate object, do a little research and give a little presentation to the rest of the class; another activity is the classic debate where you could divide the class into opposing teams; Chong suggest having students argue for or against something they would normally oppose or disagree with. This is a good way for students to try to understand something from another’s perspective.

Most of the activities involve trying to see life through someone’s else’s eyes. I saw a similar activity in Buenos Aries a few years ago when students used shoes to imagine the shoes lives.

by Chris Scott, January 2020

Reference List

Chia Suan Chong 17 July 2019, Ten ways to consider different perspectives, English Teaching Professional, viewed 30 December 2019, < https://www.etprofessional.com/ten-ways-to-consider-different-perspectives>.

Clelia Pineda-Báez December 2009, Critical Thinking in the EFL Classroom: The Search for a Pedagogical Alternative to Improve English Learning, ResearchGate, viewed 30 December 2019, < https://www.researchgate.net/publication/277834572_Critical_Thinking_in_the_EFL_Classroom_The_Search_for_a_Pedagogical_Alternative_to_Improve_English_Learning >.

Anthony Schmidt [n.d.], CRITICAL THINKING AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING PT. 1, EFL magazine, viewed 30 December 2019, < https://www.eflmagazine.com/critical-thinking-english-language-teaching/ >

Categories
apps B1 Test English Exams English Language School English Testing Eurospeak Southampton free apps freeapps IELTS Exam Preparation international student card Language Learning Language School online english Reading skills Solent University Southampton Southampton University Summer School websites

Mejora tu Listening

Si estás intentando mejorar tu audición en inglés, es importante que escuches tanto como sea posible sobre temas en los que estás realmente interesado – si no estuvieras escuchando ese tema en tu lengua materna, probablemente tampoco querrías escucharlo en inglés.

Letra de canciones: Primero, elige una canción en inglés que te guste. Luego busca el video lírico correspondiente (video musical con letras) en YouTube, escucha la canción y cántala con la ayuda de las letras.  

Películas/ programas de televisión: Piensa en un género que te guste. Busca una película o programa de televisión en inglés de ese género y mírala!  

BBC Radio 4: Si tu inglés ya es relativamente bueno, intenta escuchar BBC Radio 4. No hay música, pero hay muchas conversaciones en forma de programas que se ven a menudo en la televisión inglesa.  

Intercambio de idiomas: Busca a alguien con quien puedas practicar inglés. ¿Por qué no te reúnes con alguien y hablas? Te verás obligado no sólo a hablar por ti mismo, sino también a escuchar lo que dice tu contraparte. 

TED Talks: TED Talks es un sitio web con muchas presentaciones en inglés. Las presentaciones son sobre muchos temas diferentes, así que puedes elegir algo que te interese. También es posible activar y desactivar los subtítulos. Es una buena idea escuchar la presentación una vez sin subtítulos y luego de nuevo con los subtítulos para buscar algo que se te haya pasado por alto o que no hayas entendido. 

English version https://eurospeak.org.uk/eurospeakblog/2019/01/04/improve-your-listening/

Categories
Academic IELTS CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Language School eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English Reading Southampton Study Abroad Uncategorized

Akademisches und Allgemeines IELTS – Was ist der Unterschied?

Es gibt zwei Versionen der IELTS-Prüfung: Akademisches und Allgemeines. Hier ist ein kurzer Guide zu den Unterschieden (und Ähnlichkeiten) zwischen den beiden Arten 

Beide Versionen der IELTS-Prüfung bestehen aus vier Abschnitten: „Hören“, „Lesen“, „Schreiben“ und „Sprechen. Die Abschnitte Hören und Sprechen sind in beiden Versionen gleich, Die Abschnitte Lesen und Schreiben sind  jedoch unterschiedlich.  

In beiden Versionen hören Sie im Bereich Hören insgesamt vier Monologe und Gespräche und beantworten dazu eine Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Fragen. Sie werden die Aufnahme nur einmal hören und der Test dauert ca. dreißig Minuten.  

In beiden Versionen beantworten Sie im Bereich Sprechen Fragen zu vertrauten Themen. Sprechen anschließend ein bis zwei Minuten lang kontinuierlich über das Thema und beantworten Fragen zu abstrakteren Themen. Die Sprechprüfung findet individuell mit einem Prüfer statt. Sie ist elf bis vierzehn Minuten lang.  

Für Academic Reading lesen Sie drei längere Texte und beantworten eine Vielzahl von Fragen dazu. Die Texte sind eher akademischer Natur. Sie haben eine Stunde Zeit, um den Test abzuschließen.  

Für General Reading lesen Sie ebenfalls drei Texte und beantworten eine Vielzahl von Fragen zu diesen. Allerdings beziehen sich diese Texte mehr auf arbeitsrelevante Themen und allgemeine Interessen. Dieser Test dauert ebenfalls dreißig Minuten.  

Für Academic Writing schreiben Sie zwei TexteDer erste ist eine Zusammenfassung der Informationen. Möglicherweise werden Sie aufgefordert, Informationen aus einem Diagrammeiner Grafik oder einer Tabelle zusammenzufassen, welche einen Prozess, ObjekteKarten oder Pläne zeigen könnenDer zweite Text soll ein Aufsatz sein. Sie haben insgesamt eine Stunde Zeit für beide Schreibaufgaben.  

Für General Writing müssen Sie auch zwei Texte verfassen. Die erste Aufgabe ist ein Brief und die zweite Aufgabe ist ein Aufsatz. Die Dauer der Prüfung beträgt auch hier insgesamt eine Stunde für beide Schreibaufgaben.  

Jetzt wissen Sie etwas mehr über die Unterschiede und die Ähnlichkeiten zwischen Akademischem und Allgemeinem IELTS.  

 

English version:

Academic or General IELTS?

Categories
Academic IELTS B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Language School eurospeak Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation General IELTS IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Learn English Reading Southampton

ESPECULAR SOBRE LAS FOTOS EN LOS EXÁMENES DE EXPRESIÓN ORAL

¿Te preguntas qué decir cuando tienes que hablar de fotos en tu examen de expresión oral? Especular es la respuesta. “Pero ¿qué es especular y cómo lo hago?” Te oigo preguntar. Sigue leyendo para obtener la respuesta. 

Especular es cuando adivinas algo basado en la evidencia, y usar modales de especulación es una gran manera de especular. Aquí tienes algunos ejemplos: 

 

 

I think hmust be happy because he’s smiling. 

 

Aquí usamos must + bare / base infinitive para mostrar que estás casi completamente seguro de que algo es verdad. 

 

He’s looking at a website, so he could be looking for another job. 

 

Aquí temenos could + be + ing para mostrar posibilidad. 

 

He looks injured. I reckon he might have broken his leg. 

 

Aquí usamos might + have + past participle para mostrar posibilidad. 

 

She seems tired, so I think she may have been working very hard today. 

 

Aquí temenos may + have + been + ing para mostrar posibilidad 

 

También podemos usar can’t para mostrar que estás casi completamente seguro de que algo no es cierto, por ejemplo: 

 

She can’t have slept enough last night because she looks tired. 

 

Los dos primeros ejemplos son sobre el presente. Si estás haciendo el examen B2 First, puedes impresionar a los examinadores usando modales de especulación en el presente. 

 

Los últimos tres ejemplos son sobre el pasado. Si estás realizando el examen C1 Advanced, puedes impresionar a los examinadores utilizando modales de especulación del pasado. 

 

Por lo tanto, no te quedes sin palabras cuando tengas que hablar de fotos en tu examen de expresión oral. Especula basado en lo que puedes ver y usa modales de especulación para hacerlo. 

 

Categories
Academic IELTS B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation English Courses eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English General IELTS IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English Southampton Study Abroad

Cambridge vs. IELTS – Welche Prüfung ist die richtige Wahl für mich?

Einige der häufigsten Fragen, die uns von den Studenten gestellt werden, sind: Worin besteht der Unterschied zwischen Cambridge-Prüfungen und IELTS oder Welche Prüfung sollte ich ablegen? Es sind die 2 größten Prüfungen in Großbritannien, also werfen Sie einen Blick auf unsere praktische Tabelle unten, um zu entscheiden, welche für Sie die Beste ist. 

 

  Cambridge  IELTS 
Prüfungsarten  Verschiedene Prüfungen für verschiedene Stufen – KET (A2), PET (B1), FCE (B2), CAE (C1) und CPE (C2)  Die gleiche Prüfung für alle Stufen, aber Sie entscheiden sich für Akademisches Englisch oder Allgemeines Englisch. 
Benotung  Wenn Sie die A-C-Note bestehen oder aber scheitern solltenbekommen Sie, wenn die Stufe hoch genug war, trotzdem ein Zertifikat von der darunter liegenden Stufe.  Sie erhalten eine Punktzahl zwischen 1-9. 
Lerngebiete  Lerngebiete – Sprechen, Hören, Schreiben, Lesen und Gebrauch des Englischen (letzteres konzentriert sich auf Grammatik und Wortschatz).  Lerngebiete – Sprechen, Hören, Schreiben und Lesen   
Zertifikat  Sie erhalten ein Zertifikat, das für immer gültig ist.  Ihr Zertifikat wird in der Regel nur für zwei Jahre nach Ablegung der Prüfung an entsprechenden Institutionen akzeptiert.  
Zweck  Um ein Allgemeines Englischniveau nachzuweisen; akzeptiert von einigen Universitätskursen.  Um an eine Universität in Großbritannien zu gehen; für einige Arten von Visa; um im NHS (National Health Service= Nationaler Gesundheitsdienst) zu arbeiten. 

 

Wenn Sie sich nicht sicher sind, denken Sie darüber nach, warum Sie eine Prüfung ablegen wollen – machen Sie es, um Ihr allgemeines Niveau belegen zu können oder einen Kurs an der Universität zu besuchen? Oder um einen Job oder ein Visum zu bekommen? Auf der Website der jeweiligen Organisation finden Sie heraus, was sie brauchen – oft werden beide Arten der Prüfungen akzeptiert.  

Cambridge vs IELTS – Which one to choose?

Categories
Academic IELTS CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Exams English Language School English Testing European Funding eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English General IELTS IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation international student card Language School Learn English Life in Reading online english Reading Reading University Southampton Southampton University Study Abroad Summer School Universities in UK

Benefits of reading and books recommendations

There is a great deal of research on the benefits of reading for students of a second language. Among them are learning a wide range of vocabulary, improving our written expression, improving general language skills, being motivated to read, developing our autonomy as learners, developing empathy and becoming better readers.

Before starting a book we have to take into account two things, that it is to your taste and that the difficulty of the book fits your level in that language.

To do this Eurospeak will show you below a selection of books that are available at the Eurospeak Southampton school.

Elementary level

The Watchers, Jim and Stella, an English brother and sister on holiday on Crete, and Nikos, their Cretan friend, go into the caves. But the watchers are waiting for them…

The adventures of Tom Sawyer, It tells the adventures of Tom and his friends in a graveyard, in a old house and in a cave… why is Tom afraid?

The Battle of Newton Road, a civil engineer wants to knock down the houses and build a new road. And the people of Newton Road are very angry. But can they win the battle?

A White Heron Sylvia, a shy nine-year-old, is bringing home the milk cow when she meets a young ornithologist who is hunting birds for his collection of specimens. He goes with her to her grandmother’s house. Her grandmother, Mrs. Tilley, has rescued Sylvia from a crowded home in the city, where she was languishing.

The Railway Children

Pre-intermediate level

The Fall of the House of Usher and Other Stories is narrated by a man who has been invited to visit his childhood friend Usher. Usher gradually makes clear that his twin sister has been placed in the family vault not quite dead.

The Canterbury Tales , a story told around another story or stories. The frame of the story opens with a gathering of people at the Tabard Inn in London who are preparing for their journey to the shrine of St. Becket in Canterbury.

Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Boscombe Pool The deceased’s estranged son is strongly implicated. Holmes quickly determines that a mysterious third man may be responsible for the crime, unraveling a thread involving a secret criminal past, thwarted love, and blackmail.

The Man with Two Shadows and Other Ghost Stories

Intermediate level

Lorna Doone One day John meets and falls in love with Lorna, a member of the Doone family. She is betrothed to the son of the Doone heir, Carver, and he will do everything in his power to force the marriage on her.

The Picture of Dorian Gray a young man named Dorian Gray who has a portrait painted of himself. The artist, Basil Hallward, thinks Dorian Gray is very beautiful, and becomes obsessed with Dorian. One day in Basil’s garden, Dorian Gray meets a man named Lord Henry Wotton.

Alexander the Great

Advance level

Oliver Twist is a nine-year-old orphan boy who doesn’t know who his parents were. He escapes from a workhouse to London where he meets the ‘Artful Dodger’, leader of the gang of the juvenile pickpockets.

Categories
British Weather CAE Exam Preparation Culture English Courses English Exams English Language School English Testing eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation international student card Language Learning Language School Learn English Life in Reading Reading Reading University Southampton Southampton University Summer School

Consejos para ahorrar en Inglaterra

Alimentos

– En cuanto a los alimentos, se pueden comprar productos con fecha de caducidad cercana, estos productos generalmente tienen un descuento.

– Puedes preparar tu propio almuerzo para el trabajo o para la escuela, es una buena manera de ahorrar en el mes. Si crees que no tienes tiempo, puedes dedicar una o dos horas durante el fin de semana para prepar todas tus comidas de la semana, esto te permitirá comer más sano, comer lo que te gusta y ahorrar algo de dinero.

– Si no quieres cocinar pero aun así quieres comer bien sin que sea demasiado caro, aquí tienes la aplicación “Too Good To Go”.

¡El concepto es muy simple, gracias a esta aplicación se pueden recoger los diferentes artículos no vendidos que se encuentran en restaurantes, panaderías, pastelerías e incluso supermercados! ¡Por lo tanto, estarás haciendo un gesto ecológico y económico y evitando el desperdicio!

– En cuanto a los supermercados, en Inglaterra hay diferentes tipos de supermercados, es decir, hay supermercados muy accesibles y otros algo más caros, así que hay que saber diferenciarlos:

Los supermercados más económicos: LIDL, ASDA, Aldi, Iceland (que es un supermercado que vende principalmente productos congelados).

También puede visitar los supermercados más famosos de Inglaterra que también ofrecen precios muy razonables: Sainsburys, Tesco, The Co-operative

Transporte

El transporte es bastante caro en Inglaterra, por lo que es importante conocer todos los consejos para poder viajar más barato:

Coge el autobús

Para los viajes largos, existe el “National Express”, una compañía de autobuses que ofrece precios asequibles. Se trata de un autobús común donde encontrarás tomas de corriente y puertos USB para cargar el móvil así como aseos. Además, el autobus está equipado con aire acondicionado, asientos XL ypuedes conectarte a su wifi de manera gratuita.

Los precios generalmente cambian dependiendo del período de tiempo de antelación con el que reserves el billete. Siempre es mejor hacerlo por adelantado.

¡Además, podrás disfrutar de descuentos con National Express Coach si compras una tarjeta de descuento la cual es muy barata! Aquí encontrará las diferentes opciones de suscripción disponibles.

También es posible compartir el coche, lo que te permitirá compartir los gastos de gasolina, pasar un buen rato y contaminar menos. He aquí una selección que puede utilizarse en el Reino Unido:

Blablacar, es el sitio número uno en Europa

Gocarshare para Inglaterra

Drivercollect: viajes compartidos en Inglaterra

Liftshare: comunidad de vehículos compartidos en Inglaterra

Europe carpooling: este es un portal de uso compartido para todos los europeos, por lo que se puede utilizar en otros países.

 

Entretenimiento

Por último, para las salidas y las actividades de ocio, ¡no te dejes engañar y elige actividades gratuitas!

– Si te encuentras y desea visitar el patrimonio cultural, por ejemplo, la mayoría de los museos son gratuitos (Museo Británico, Museo de Historia Natural).

– En cuanto a la hermosa abadía de Westminster un consejo, ir allí durante las misas, ahorrarás el pago de 23 libras esterlinas. Consultar toda la información en su página web.

– También puedes pasear por los diferentes barrios y parques de la ciudad sin gastar una libra!

– Para sus salidas nocturnas, algunos bares y discotecas no cobran hasta las 23:00 horas. ¡Ten en cuenta que estos establecimientos cierran a las 3 de la mañana podrás pasar una buena noche gratis!

 

Estos son todos los consejos para ahorrar en Inglaterra, así que ahora depende de ti. 😊

Categories
British Weather CAE Exam Preparation Culture English Courses English Exams English Language School English Testing European Funding eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English General IELTS IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation international student card Language Learning Language School Learn English Life in Reading Reading Reading University Southampton Southampton University student card Study Abroad Summer School UK Weather weather uk

4 ways to keep your English at its best during the summer holidays

Summer is coming! Probably this is your most awaited season …. Holidays, sun, beach and trips!

Everything is so wonderful that makes us forget about our daily life.

In this blog post we will give some tips to improve your English this summer and to avoid feeling guilty next September.

If you do at least a couple of these, I assure you that not only will come back from the holidays more tanned, but also with better English.

Courses abroad

If you are young and want to have fun while learning English, the best option to take advantage of this holiday is to take an English course abroad. Eurospeak Language School is located in Reading and Southampton (UK), you can take a course from one week, from 15 up to 25 hours per week. The school will also help you with the accommodation.

 

Apps to learn English

The mobile is your faithful companion, isn’t it? Well, take advantage of it and do something productive like learn English. There are countless apps to learn languages, so I recommend that you do a simple search and choose the most suitable.

 

Language exchanges

This way of practicing your English is great. Indeed, you can do it anywhere in the world and there are also apps for it, apart from Facebook groups and MeetUps. Language exchanges consist of meeting one or more people and having conversations in your language and in the other person’s language. In this way both of you practice the language you are learning and both of you learn through each other.

 

Netflix, HBO, YouTube and other platforms

If you are keen on cinema or simply enjoy relaxed plans. Watching movies and series in English will give a boost to your language skills while you enjoy your favourite entertainment. Many of them have the option of keeping them on your mobile, so you can watch them during a journey or while waiting in a queue.

 

There are many ways not to forget your English this summer… and besides there are many other ways! Don’t forget to get cracking this summer to achieve your goals.