Tag Archives: IELTS

BEGINNING & ENDING AN INFORMAL EMAIL OR LETTER

When you write an email or a letter to a friend or family member, it is usually appropriate to write informally. Here are some informal words and expressions that can help you to begin and end your emails or letters in an informal way.

Formal email / letters start with Dear, but when you’re writing to a friend, you can be much more, well, friendly. You could try these ways of saying hello:

  • Hi, Hiya, Hey, Heeeeellllllllloooooo,

You may want to follow any of the above with your friend’s name, but always use a comma at the end.

Next, move down two lines and start with a capital letter, but what can you write here? Here are some suggestions:

  • This is just a quick email / letter to say…

It was great to hear from you.

Thanks for your email / letter.

Sorry I’ve taken so long to write back.

Of course, you then need to write the main body of your email / letter. When you get to the end, you could try finishing with one of these expressions:

  • Well, that’s all for now.

Give my love to everyone.

Don’t forget to write soon.   

followed by:

  • See you soon,

See ya soon, (ya is a very informal way of writing you)

All the best,

Lots of love,

and your name – don’t forget your own name – that’s very important!

So, the next time you’re writing an email or a letter to a friend, try using some of these expressions to set an informal tone.

WANNA SOUND LIKE A NATIVE?

One way to help you sound like a native speaker of English is to pronounce words in the way that natives do. Three examples of native pronunciation are gonna, wanna and gotta. But what do they mean and how can you use them?

  • Gonna is a contraction of going to, so you can use it when using be going to

Example: I’m gonna go out tonight. = I’m going to go out tonight

You can use it with all persons – first, second and third person, singular and plural – and the stress is on the first syllable: gonna.

  • Wanna is a contraction of want to. You can use it with all persons, except third person singular because third person singular -s just gets in the way!

Examples: I wanna eat a biscuit. = I want to eat a biscuit.

They wanna buy some new clothes. = They want to buy some new clothes.

but NOT: He wanna go swimming.

For wanna, the stress is also on the first syllable.

  • Gotta is a contraction of got to. You can use it instead of got to or have got to / has got to and it works for all persons.

Examples: You’ve gotta do it! / You gotta do it! = You’ve got to do it!

He’s gotta have it! / He gotta have it. = He’s got to have it!

The stress is again on the first syllable: gotta.

You will find gonna, wanna and gotta are most often used in conversational English or in written English when the writer wants to emphasise the pronunciation of the words.

So, wanna sound like a native? Using gonna, wanna and gotta’s gotta do the trick!

For more information about studying General English, Cambridge Exam Preparation or IELTS Exam Preparation courses with Europeak Southampton or Eurospeak Reading, please contact us on:

Eurospeak Southampton
10 Cumberland Place
Southampton
Hampshire
SO15 2BH
+44 (0) 2380 636 494
hello@eurospeak.org.uk
www.eurospeak.org.uk

Eurospeak Reading
29a Chain Street
Reading
Berkshire
RG1 2HX
+44 (0) 1189 589 599
info@eurospeak.org.uk
www.eurospeak.org.uk

Academic or General IELTS?

Academic and General IELTS – What’s the difference?

There are two versions of the IELTS exam: Academic and General. Here’s a quick guide to the differences (and similarities) between them.

Both versions of the IELTS exam have four sections: Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. The Listening and Speaking sections are the same in both versions, but the Reading and Writing sections are different.

For both versions, in the Listening section, you listen to a total of four monologues and conversations, and answer a variety of different questions on them. You only listen once and the test is approximately thirty minutes.

For both versions, in the Speaking section, you answer questions on familiar topics, speak continuously for one to two minutes on a topic, and answer questions on more abstract topics. You do the speaking exam individually with one examiner. It’s eleven to fourteen minutes long.

For Academic Reading, you read three longer texts and answer a variety of questions about them. The texts are more academic in nature. You have one hour to complete the test.

For General Reading, you also read three texts and answer a variety of questions on them, but these texts are more related to work and general interests. This test is also thirty minutes.

For Academic Writing, you write two pieces of writing. The first is a summary of information. You might be asked to summarise information from a chart or graph, a table, or a diagram showing a process, objects or maps or plans. The second piece of writing is an essay. You have one hour in total for both Writing tasks.

For General Writing, you also write two pieces of writing. The first task is a letter and the second task is an essay. The length of the exam is also one hour in total for both Writing tasks.

Now you know a little more about the difference and similarities between Academic and General IELTS.

At Eurospeak Language School we offer our IELTS exam students real IELTS practice material and for homework and in class.

We also have additional resources, practice IELTS exams and sample IELTS material for you to use in your own time, at home, or to study in the students’ area.

For more information about studying General English, Cambridge Exam Preparation or IELTS Exam Preparation courses with Europeak Reading or Eurospeak Southampton, please contact us on:

Eurospeak Southampton
10 Cumberland Place
Southampton
Hampshire
SO15 2BH
+44 (0) 2380 636494
hello@eurospeak.org.uk
www.eurospeak.org.uk

Eurospeak Reading
29a Chain Street
Reading
Berkshire
RG1 2HX
+44 (0) 1189 589599
info@eurospeak.org.uk
www.eurospeak.org.uk

 

IELTS Courses at Eurospeak Reading, Berkshire

We have new IELTS courses that have just ‘kicked-off’! You can still join our IELTS course in Reading (Berkshire) if you are looking to prepare for the test.

We have many groups of hopeful (and with our teachers I’m sure they’ll succeed) students currently enrolled in our ACADEMIC IELTS classes. We have many different nationalities for many different courses – so come and join!

Courses will be running all summer with groups finishing and new groups starting regularly.
Many students find IELTS very difficult so it is definitely worthwhile joining the course whether you want study at a UK university or you are just taking the exam for visa purposes.

So if you want to get the IELTS score you want – join Eurospeak Language School in Berkshire now. Our students have consistently achieved their desired IELTS scores.

Contact us now. Tell: 0118 958 9599, Email: info@eurospeak.org.uk
Address: 29a Chain Street, Reading, RG1 2HX, Berkshire